Volume 22, Issue 12 p. 2398-2407
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

The effect of a low glycaemic index diet on reducing day-long glycaemia in healthy young adults: A randomized crossover trial

Hannah Wing Han Hon BSc

Hannah Wing Han Hon BSc

School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China

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Tommy Hon Ting Wong MNutrDiet

Tommy Hon Ting Wong MNutrDiet

School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China

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Iris Mei Ying Tse BSc

Iris Mei Ying Tse BSc

School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China

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Jimmy Chun Yu Louie PhD

Corresponding Author

Jimmy Chun Yu Louie PhD

School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China

Correspondence

Jimmy Chun Yu Louie, The University of Hong Kong, 5S-14 Kadoorie Biological Sciences Building, 1 Pokfulam Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, SAR, China.

Email: [email protected]

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First published: 05 August 2020
Citations: 2

Funding information: This study was funded by internal funding of the University of Hong Kong (Seed Funding for Basic Research, ID: 201711159182). No external funding was received for this study.

Abstract

Aim

To compare the effect of a low glycaemic index (LGI) diet on reducing day-long glycaemia with a macronutrient-matched high glycaemic index (HGI) diet, using customized meal delivery to ensure compliance.

Materials and Methods

We conducted a single-blinded, randomized crossover trial in 14 healthy adults (57% female) with a mean ± SD age of 21.6 ± 1.7 years. A flash glucose monitoring sensor was installed on the subjects on day 1 to capture the interstitial glucose level every 15 minutes for 14 days. Subjects were randomized to receive an LGI (dietary GI = 40) or HGI (dietary GI = 60) diet (three meals and two snacks) from day 2 for 5 consecutive days, followed by a 2-day washout, then switched to the alternative diet for another 5 days. A paired t-test was used to test the differences in the incremental area under the curve (iAUC) of glucose, postprandial glucose (PPG) concentration and maximum postprandial glucose rise (MPGR) between the LGI and HGI periods.

Results

Subjects had lower iAUC for average day-long glycaemia during the LGI intervention period compared with the HGI period (mean ± SD, 865 ± 297 vs. 1024 ± 267 mmol x min/L; P = .047). PPG for breakfast and snack 2, and MPGR for breakfast, snack 2 and dinner, were lower in the LGI period.

Conclusions

In young healthy adults, following an LGI diet resulted in lower average day-long glycaemia compared with a macronutrient-matched HGI diet. Our results support the use of LGI diets to reduce the risk of developing glucose intolerance.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST

No potential conflicts of interest are reported in relation to this study.

PEER REVIEW

The peer review history for this article is available at https://publons.com/publon/10.1111/dom.14167.